Fire Law Roundup for May 30, 2022

In this week’s episode of Fire Law Roundup for May 30, 2022, Brad and Curt discuss a termination case out of Sacramento; a civil suit by a terminated San Francisco firefighter claiming the city violated the California Firefighter Procedural Bill of Rights; the settlement of a lawsuit by a former Cleveland battalion chief; another AFFF lawsuit, this time by the City of San Diego against the foam manufacturers; and the sentencing of a union treasurer for stealing over $200k from the Detroit Firefighters local.

About Curt Varone

Curt Varone has over 40 years of fire service experience and 30 as a practicing attorney licensed in both Rhode Island and Maine. His background includes 29 years as a career firefighter in Providence (retiring as a Deputy Assistant Chief), as well as volunteer and paid on call experience. He is the author of two books: Legal Considerations for Fire and Emergency Services, (2006, 2nd ed. 2011, 3rd ed. 2014) and Fire Officer's Legal Handbook (2007), and is a contributing editor for Firehouse Magazine writing the Fire Law column.
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