DC Chief Acknowledges Mistake on Discipline

Here is a followup on the story from Monday about the DC fire lieutenant who retired and escaped discipline. D.C. Fire & EMS Chief Gregory Dean is admitting that a mistake was made in the handling of the discipline of a fire officer accused of delaying his crews response to a choking child.

Lt. Guy Valentine was accused of a delaying his response to the choking death of 18-month-old Martin Cuesta on March 18, 2015. Despite being three blocks from the scene, it took crews nearly 11 minutes to arrive on scene. Lt. Valentine reportedly retired over the holidays as he awaited a trial board on disciplinary charges.

Here is the act: Firefighter Retirement While Under Disciplinary Investigation Amendment Act of 2014

About Curt Varone

Curt Varone has over 40 years of fire service experience and 30 as a practicing attorney licensed in both Rhode Island and Maine. His background includes 29 years as a career firefighter in Providence (retiring as a Deputy Assistant Chief), as well as volunteer and paid on call experience. He is the author of two books: Legal Considerations for Fire and Emergency Services, (2006, 2nd ed. 2011, 3rd ed. 2014) and Fire Officer's Legal Handbook (2007), and is a contributing editor for Firehouse Magazine writing the Fire Law column.
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