PA Lieutenant in Altercation With Troopers Faces Charges After All

It appears we have not heard the end of the Pennsylvania Police-Fire War that erupted a few weeks ago. Recall on September 29, 2019, Goodwill Fire Co. Lieutenant Mike Naylor got into an altercation with Pennsylvania State Troopers at the scene of a single vehicle accident with entrapment on Rt. I-83.

Troopers arrived first on the scene and believing the driver to be overdosing (in need of Narcan), decided to break the windows. According to the York Daily Record “Trooper Aaron Patschke, who had the Narcan, opened the driver’s side door, and [Trooper Mitchell] Penrose began cutting the driver’s side airbag to be able to get to the driver.”

Upon his arrival, Lt. Naylor yelled at the troopers to stop breaking the glass and began arguing with them resulting in him being handcuffed. According to initial reports he was released with both sides apologizing for the episode. However, according to the Daily Record charges were in fact filed and are pending before District Judge Lindy Lane Sweeney.

Dave Statter is on this one as well.

About Curt Varone

Curt Varone has over 40 years of fire service experience and 30 as a practicing attorney licensed in both Rhode Island and Maine. His background includes 29 years as a career firefighter in Providence (retiring as a Deputy Assistant Chief), as well as volunteer and paid on call experience. He is the author of two books: Legal Considerations for Fire and Emergency Services, (2006, 2nd ed. 2011, 3rd ed. 2014) and Fire Officer's Legal Handbook (2007), and is a contributing editor for Firehouse Magazine writing the Fire Law column.
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