BWI Settles Discrimination Suit With Medic

The Maryland Aviation Administration has reached a settlement with a paramedic who claimed she was the victim of gender discrimination and retaliation while working at the Thurgood Marshall Baltimore-Washington International Airport (BWI).

Barbara Lowman claimed she was passed over for promotion to EMS Division Chief in 2015 in favor of a less-qualified man. At the time she was serving as an acting Captain staffing an administrative position. Lowman filed a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

In June, 2017, the EEOC issued a determination letter supporting Lowman’s claim of discrimination. Shortly thereafter she was removed from her staff position as an acting captain and returned to a line position on shift as a medic. The MAA justified the move as being necessary because a newly created position of EMS captain was being created and they did not want to show favoritism towards her as the details about the selection process were being developed.

Lowman complained and was reassigned back to the staff position the next day once legal counsel was advised of the move. She applied for the EMS captain’s position but ultimately retired prior to the decision being made. She filed suit in April of 2018. The settlement calls for Lowman to be paid $157,500.00.

More on the story.

Here is a copy of the original complaint:

About Curt Varone

Curt Varone has over 40 years of fire service experience and 30 as a practicing attorney licensed in both Rhode Island and Maine. His background includes 29 years as a career firefighter in Providence (retiring as a Deputy Assistant Chief), as well as volunteer and paid on call experience. He is the author of two books: Legal Considerations for Fire and Emergency Services, (2006, 2nd ed. 2011, 3rd ed. 2014) and Fire Officer's Legal Handbook (2007), and is a contributing editor for Firehouse Magazine writing the Fire Law column.
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