PA Woman Cited For Driving Over Fire Hose That Injured Two Firefighters

A woman who drove over a fire hose at a fire scene resulting in injuries to two Pennsylvania firefighters, has been charged with reckless endangerment.

Karissa Morder, 21, was leaving an apartment complex in North Londonderry Township on January 9, 2018, when she drove over an uncharged hose that had been stretched by Palmyra Fire Department. At the time, the fire department was dealing with a fire in one of the units in the complex.

Morder’s vehicle dragged the fire hose, knocking two firefighters to the ground. One of the unnamed firefighters was knocked unconscious suffering serious head and back injuries that required him to be hospitalized, the other firefighter suffered shoulder injuries.

The incident also caused $2,119.36 in damage to the hose and the fire apparatus to which it was connected. Police charged Morder with recklessly endangering another person, failure to stop at an accident involving damage to property, and unauthorized driving over a fire hose.

More on the story.

About Curt Varone

Curt Varone has over 40 years of fire service experience and 30 as a practicing attorney licensed in both Rhode Island and Maine. His background includes 29 years as a career firefighter in Providence (retiring as a Deputy Assistant Chief), as well as volunteer and paid on call experience. He is the author of two books: Legal Considerations for Fire and Emergency Services, (2006, 2nd ed. 2011, 3rd ed. 2014) and Fire Officer's Legal Handbook (2007), and is a contributing editor for Firehouse Magazine writing the Fire Law column.
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