Canadian Fire Chief Accused of Additional Sexual Exploitation Charges

An Ontario fire chief who was suspended last December when accusations of sexual misconduct with an under age boy first surfaced, is now facing 17 counts as additional victims started coming forward.

Kingsville Fire Chief Robert Kissner, 60, is facing 11 counts of sexual assault, 5 of sexual exploitation and 1 of sexual interference. He opted to retire in February rather than challenge internal disciplinary charges.

Ontario Provincial police have been conducting a wide-ranging investigation after additional victims started coming forward with allegations of abuse dating back to 1989.

Interestingly just before the first victim came forward, Kissner announced the creation of a junior firefighter program.

Upon his arrest, the program was suspended. More on the story.

About Curt Varone

Curt Varone has over 40 years of fire service experience and 30 as a practicing attorney licensed in both Rhode Island and Maine. His background includes 29 years as a career firefighter in Providence (retiring as a Deputy Assistant Chief), as well as volunteer and paid on call experience. He is the author of two books: Legal Considerations for Fire and Emergency Services, (2006, 2nd ed. 2011, 3rd ed. 2014) and Fire Officer's Legal Handbook (2007), and is a contributing editor for Firehouse Magazine writing the Fire Law column.
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