Fire Law Roundup for January 30, 2023

In this episode of Fire Law Roundup for January 30, 2023, Brad and Curt discuss a race discrimination lawsuit filed by a paid-on-call lieutenant in Michigan; a ruling by the New York Supreme Court Appellate Division that four fire departments sued by a homeowner after a fire cannot be held liable for negligence because they did not owe the homeowner a special duty; a ruling granting summary judgment to a city in a lawsuit filed by Indiana firefighter who was demoted for disobeying orders related to rumor-spreading about a subordinate’s sexual preferences; two cases where medics were accused of improperly tending to patients on police-assist calls where the patients died (these are in addition to the Illinois case where two medics were charged with murder in the death of a patient); and a sexual harassment lawsuit out of FDNY.

Michigan Lieutenant Alleges Race Discrimination

Four NY Fire Departments Not Liable For Housefire

Indiana Firefighter’s Discrimination and Retaliation Claims Rejected

More Fallout From EMS Related Deaths: Chicago and Memphis

FDNY EMT Accuses EMS Chief of Sexual Harassment

About Curt Varone

Curt Varone has over 45 years of fire service experience and 35 as a practicing attorney licensed in both Rhode Island and Maine. His background includes 29 years as a career firefighter in Providence (retiring as a Deputy Assistant Chief), as well as volunteer and paid on call experience. He is the author of two books: Legal Considerations for Fire and Emergency Services, (2006, 2nd ed. 2011, 3rd ed. 2014, 4th ed. 2022) and Fire Officer's Legal Handbook (2007), and is a contributing editor for Firehouse Magazine writing the Fire Law column.
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