Let’s Go Brandon T-Shirt Prompts Investigation in San Francisco Fire Department

A San Francisco firefighter is facing a disciplinary investigation following a social media photo of him wearing a “Let’s Go Brandon” shirt while apparently engaged in fire department activities. The photo was posted on Twitter, and the poster tagged Mayor London Breed, a city supervisor, and the fire department, asking the question “is this the new official uniform for the SFFD?”

The San Francisco Fire Department issued the following statement about the incident:

“Today, 09-24-2022, the San Francisco Fire Department was made aware via social media of an employee wearing a non-SFFD tee-shirt while on duty. This violates the Department’s uniform policy and does not reflect the views and opinions of the San Francisco Fire Department. The Department took immediate action once made aware. The SFFD has followed internal and City policies to handle this incident.”

Here is a link to more.

About Curt Varone

Curt Varone has over 40 years of fire service experience and 30 as a practicing attorney licensed in both Rhode Island and Maine. His background includes 29 years as a career firefighter in Providence (retiring as a Deputy Assistant Chief), as well as volunteer and paid on call experience. He is the author of two books: Legal Considerations for Fire and Emergency Services, (2006, 2nd ed. 2011, 3rd ed. 2014) and Fire Officer's Legal Handbook (2007), and is a contributing editor for Firehouse Magazine writing the Fire Law column.
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