Denver Settles With Female Victim of Peeping Lieutenant for $100k

The city of Denver has approved a $100,000 settlement with a female firefighter who was the victim of a digital peeping-Tom case perpetrated by a lieutenant at her station. Daniel Flesner was found guilty of criminal invasion of privacy and attempt to commit tampering with physical evidence last October, and sentenced to two years probation.

The victim discovered a hidden camera in her fire station dorm bedroom in 2019. She initially reported the camera to Flesner, claiming it was aimed at where she usually changed cloths. Flesner took possession of the camera and was able to destroy some but not all of the imagery on the memory card. According to Flesner, the camera was intended as a gag.

Flesner was ordered to complete moral recognition therapy and a mental health screening, and could face jail time if he fails to complete those requirements.

About Curt Varone

Curt Varone has over 45 years of fire service experience and 35 as a practicing attorney licensed in both Rhode Island and Maine. His background includes 29 years as a career firefighter in Providence (retiring as a Deputy Assistant Chief), as well as volunteer and paid on call experience. He is the author of two books: Legal Considerations for Fire and Emergency Services, (2006, 2nd ed. 2011, 3rd ed. 2014, 4th ed. 2022) and Fire Officer's Legal Handbook (2007), and is a contributing editor for Firehouse Magazine writing the Fire Law column.
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