Racism Has No Home In Our Firehouse

It didn’t take long for the public to express outrage over the fact that a ladder company on Long Island was driving around displaying a Confederate Flag earlier today. It also didn’t take long for the fire department to take immediate action to address the situation.

The leadership of the Brookhaven Fire Department became aware that one of its members had displayed the flag, and according to 1010Wins, Brookhaven Fire Chief Peter Di Pinto Jr. confirmed that “disciplinary action for this matter has already commenced.”

According to a statement released by Chief Di Pinto:

  • The unauthorized action was done without the knowledge of our leadership team and is condemned in the strongest of terms.
  • The strength of our community has always come from its diversity and our department has always sought to be inclusive.
  • We can assure our community that “Racism has no home in our Firehouse”.

Here is more on the story.

Here is a copy of the Press Release:

About Curt Varone

Curt Varone has over 40 years of fire service experience and 30 as a practicing attorney licensed in both Rhode Island and Maine. His background includes 29 years as a career firefighter in Providence (retiring as a Deputy Assistant Chief), as well as volunteer and paid on call experience. He is the author of two books: Legal Considerations for Fire and Emergency Services, (2006, 2nd ed. 2011, 3rd ed. 2014) and Fire Officer's Legal Handbook (2007), and is a contributing editor for Firehouse Magazine writing the Fire Law column.
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