Fire Law Vlog: Georgetown FLSA Updates

In this edition of Fire Law Vlog, Curt and Bill Maccarone discuss some new updates to the FLSA that will be discussed in the upcoming FLSA for Fire Departments conference this week in Georgetown, Texas. Among the changes are amendments to the US Department of Labor regulations addressing the executive, administrative and professional employee exemptions that go into effect in January, 2020, as well as some proposed changes to regular rate and the fluctuating workweek.

These changes, both enacted and proposed, will have an impact on firefighters and fire departments going forward. If you cannot make the Georgetown conference, here are our upcoming FLSA classes:

Stuart, FL February 11-13, 2020

Kansas City, MO May 5-7, 2020

Just announced: Seattle, Washington – September 15-17, 2020

About Curt Varone

Curt Varone has over 40 years of fire service experience and 30 as a practicing attorney licensed in both Rhode Island and Maine. His background includes 29 years as a career firefighter in Providence (retiring as a Deputy Assistant Chief), as well as volunteer and paid on call experience. He is the author of two books: Legal Considerations for Fire and Emergency Services, (2006, 2nd ed. 2011, 3rd ed. 2014) and Fire Officer's Legal Handbook (2007), and is a contributing editor for Firehouse Magazine writing the Fire Law column.
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