CalFire Settles With In-N-Out Burger Over 2017 Fire

A lawsuit filed by the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection to recoup the costs associated with the Huasna Fire in 2017, has been settled with In-N-Out Burger. The fire in San Luis Obispo County burned nearly 250 acres over the course for four days and cost nearly $1.2 million to fight.

According to CalFire’s lawsuit, the fire was caused by an improperly maintained tractor that was gutting grass on property owned by In-N-Out in rural Arroyo Grande. Investigators concluded the tractor ignited dry grass and spread quickly. The case was settled on confidential terms.

The San Luis Obispo Tribune quoted an email from In-N-Out general counsel Arnie Wensinger stating: “In-N-Out Burger and Cal Fire have amicably agreed to settle a lawsuit involving a fire that occurred over two years ago in September 2017.”

More on the settlement.

About Curt Varone

Curt Varone has over 40 years of fire service experience and 30 as a practicing attorney licensed in both Rhode Island and Maine. His background includes 29 years as a career firefighter in Providence (retiring as a Deputy Assistant Chief), as well as volunteer and paid on call experience. He is the author of two books: Legal Considerations for Fire and Emergency Services, (2006, 2nd ed. 2011, 3rd ed. 2014) and Fire Officer's Legal Handbook (2007), and is a contributing editor for Firehouse Magazine writing the Fire Law column.
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