California Fire Department Suing Ferrara Over Problem Aerial

The South Lake Tahoe Fire Department is suing Ferrara Fire Apparatus claiming that a $1 million aerial ladder they took delivery of in 2014 is a lemon. The apparatus, which has been out of service for the past 13 months, has experienced a number of mechanical problems that Ferrara initially addressed.

According to Fire Chief Jeff Meston, the ladder has two-wheel, four-wheel and six-wheel drive modes. Chief Meston claims it was delivered to South Lake Tahoe by Ferarra after its drivers drove it from Louisiana in six-wheel drive mode, which he claims created the ongoing problems.

Chief Meston told SouthTahoeNow.com that following a breakdown 13 months ago Ferrara refused to return the department’s calls. The City then decided to hire an attorney who specializes in California’s Lemon Law. A breach of contract suit was filed in El Dorado County Superior Court last October.

According to Chief Meston, the parties are now discussing the case with an eye toward working out a financial settlement. More on the story.

About Curt Varone

Curt Varone has over 40 years of fire service experience and 30 as a practicing attorney licensed in both Rhode Island and Maine. His background includes 29 years as a career firefighter in Providence (retiring as a Deputy Assistant Chief), as well as volunteer and paid on call experience. He is the author of two books: Legal Considerations for Fire and Emergency Services, (2006, 2nd ed. 2011, 3rd ed. 2014) and Fire Officer's Legal Handbook (2007), and is a contributing editor for Firehouse Magazine writing the Fire Law column.
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