Texas Firefighter Suspended After DWI Crash

A Texas firefighter who reportedly was responding to an alarm, crashed into an occupied dwelling and is now facing charges of driving while intoxicated.

Blake Stevens, 31, a volunteer firefighter in La Porte, was arrested after his pickup truck slammed into a child’s bedroom last night. Witnesses say he was traveling at a high rate of speed at the time, and has a reputation in the neighborhood for doing so.

Stevens has been suspended from the La Porte Fire Department. Houston Public Media is also reporting that Stevens was charged with illegally carrying a handgun besides the DWI charge.

About Curt Varone

Curt Varone has over 40 years of fire service experience and 30 as a practicing attorney licensed in both Rhode Island and Maine. His background includes 29 years as a career firefighter in Providence (retiring as a Deputy Assistant Chief), as well as volunteer and paid on call experience. He is the author of two books: Legal Considerations for Fire and Emergency Services, (2006, 2nd ed. 2011, 3rd ed. 2014) and Fire Officer's Legal Handbook (2007), and is a contributing editor for Firehouse Magazine writing the Fire Law column.
  • mr618

    And THIS, children, is why we don’t speed when responding. Not only did Stevens not make it to the call, he injured himself, and could easily have injured others. In addition, the department suddenly had a second call to deal with (or put out for mutual aid), plus he demolished his truck, caused serious damage to the home, got himself arrested, and left himself open to all sorts of liability. Oh, and he made all volunteers look bad, too. Thanks, dude.

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