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Headlines versus Reality: NY Court Bans Fire Apparatus Older than 10 years – OMG

The sensational headline seems to say it all, causing many Fire Law readers to forward the story to me asking the same question: How can a judge do that? Who does she think she is? Will this apply to us in New Jersey? Has she lost her mind?

The truth is actually quite boring and hardly newsworthy: Manhattan Supreme Court Justice Kathryn Freed ruled that if a firefighters’ union has an agreement with the city in which the city AGREES to not use apparatus older than 10 years old, and an arbitrator concludes that the provision is valid and should be enforced – THEN THE CITY HAS TO ABIDE BY ITS AGREEMENT.

So in other words, instead of sensational headlines like “The ‘rig’ is up for Bravest: Judge orders 10-yr.-old firetrucks out of fleet” it should have read: “Judge Orders City to Abide By Its Agreement.” Or perhaps even more mundane: “Judge affirms arbitrator”.

Not too much of a story there… is there….

And seriously – someone is actually disputing the following quote: “responding to any emergency with faulty equipment is decidedly a more dangerous proposition.”

Move along… no story here…

 

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Comments - Add Yours

  • Andrew

    All I had to see was the link to the NY Post to know that article was hysterical BS. The Post, which used to be semi-reliable, is now hovering down around National Enquirer and Weekly World News. To paraphrase what Don Imus once said about the Daily News, "if you work for the [NY Post], you already *know* you're full of sh*t."

  • David Jewel

    Its sad but true that certain news media twist the truth in headlines to grab attention on a daily basis mainly to get people to read the stories (which in this case were totally the opposite of the implied truth of the headlines). With that being said what idiot in the city decided that every apparatus was automatically expired after 10years. I would think the better standard would be based on mileage/wear and tear. Although out of fairness Im pretty sure FDNY apparatus take a licking in a 10yr time frame much as NYPDs average car does.. But Im also sure there are exceptions to every rule that common sense says not every apparatus is ready to be sent to the scrap heap or autctioned off to some volunteer department with lower call volume.