Oklahoma City Responds to YouTube Video

The Oklahoma City Fire Department is on the defense following the release of a YouTube video depicting the treatment of a female patient in 2010. The video appears to show some level of complacency by responders allegedly because the victim was a prostitute, but it also shows something else: firefighters taking cellphone images of a helpless victim.

 

OCFD has already adopted a formal digital imagery policy that will address photo taking going forward. Fire Chief Keith Bryant has raised a number of questions about the video, including the fairness of the editing and commentary by its maker, Brian Bates. Chief Bryant insists the treatment rendered was appropriate and the unedited video proves it. There will be more coming on this one, I’m sure.

About Curt Varone

Curt Varone has over 40 years of fire service experience and 30 as a practicing attorney licensed in both Rhode Island and Maine. His background includes 29 years as a career firefighter in Providence (retiring as a Deputy Assistant Chief), as well as volunteer and paid on call experience. He is the author of two books: Legal Considerations for Fire and Emergency Services, (2006, 2nd ed. 2011, 3rd ed. 2014) and Fire Officer's Legal Handbook (2007), and is a contributing editor for Firehouse Magazine writing the Fire Law column.
  • Wow, the “Video Vigilante” was so genuinely concerned that it took him almost two years to release the video. Lucky for all of us that fire departments respond quicker.

x

Check Also

San Francisco Fire Addresses Harassment Allegations

The San Francisco Fire Department is transferring ten officers including four battalion chiefs in the aftermath of a six-month sexual harassment investigation at Station 2. The investigation follows harassment allegations that included a complaint that someone had urinated on a female firefighter’s bed and smeared feces in her locker.

Oregon, Pennsylvania and Michigan Wrongful Termination Cases In The Fire Law Headlines

Three wrongful termination cases are in the fire law headlines today, one from Oregon, one from Pennsylvania and one from Michigan. All three are updates on cases we covered in the past few months.